Archive for the ‘Physical Description’ Category

Tip #167: Book measurements in the 300 field

If not already in the MARC record, be sure to add the dimensions of a book in the 300 field, subfield c. This information is often missing in a CIP or on-order record.

Book dimensions are always given in whole centimeters.

When measuring the size of the book being cataloged, always round up to the higher centimeter rather than rounding down to the lower one. If a book measures 24.1 centimeters on your ruler, the height of the books should be recorded as 25 cm. in the 300 subfield c.

The reasoning behind this cataloging rule is the following: If the library’s book shelves are set at 24 centimeters, a book measuring 24.1 centimeters would not fit on the shelf. It would have to be shelved in a location where the book shelves were set at 25 centimeters or higher.

The first dimension given is always the height of the book. Include the binding in the measurement.

Example:

300 __ |a 328 p. ; |c 22 cm. (AACR2)
300 __ |a 328 pages ; |c 22 cm (RDA)

Subfield c is always preceded by a semicolon.

If the width of the book is greater than the height, or if the width of the book is less than half of the height, give both the height and width in subfield c.

Examples:

300 __ |a vi, 186 p. ; |c 18 x 27 cm. (AACR2)
300 __ |a 467 pages : |b color illustrations ; |c 22 x 9 cm (RDA)

FYI: You may attach your holding to a record even if the dimensions are one or two centimeters off from your item in hand. Don’t change the record, just attach your holding.
Originally published on February 15, 2013.


Tip #158: The 300 field of an RDA book record

One field you’ll want to check when working with RDA bibliographic records is the 300 field. Here’s some tips for editing the 300 field of a book RDA record:

  • Record measurements in centimeters, just like in AACR2. However, in RDA, ‘cm’ is considered a symbol, not an abbreviation, so there’s no period.
  • The rules for whether or not there’s a period at the end of the 300 field are a bit strange. If there is no 490 field in the record, the 300 field does not end in a period. If there IS a 490 field, then the 300 field gets a period.
  • Remember there are no abbreviations in RDA, so spell out ‘illustrations’, ‘portraits’, ‘color’, ‘genealogical tables’, etc.
  • If there’s plates in the book, you don’t have to put the number of pages in brackets. Instead, use the phrase, “__ unnumbered pages of plates”.

Here are some examples:

300 __ |a 135 pages ; |c 24 cm (no 490 field in record)

300 __ |a iv, 197 pages ; |c 22 cm.
490 1_ |a A Repairman Jack novel ; |v [5]

300 __ |a 32 pages : |b colored illustrations ; |c 26 cm

300 __ |a 375 pages, 8 unnumbered pages of plates : |b maps (some color), photographs ; |c 22 cm
Originally published on November 30, 2012.


Tip #126: Running Time for videorecordings

Accurately recording the running time for videorecordings not only benefits our patrons but makes it easier for catalogers to correctly match Evergreen records to the item in hand.

The playing time given in the 300 field of a videorecording record only reflects the time for the title given in the 245 field. Bonus features or supplementary material are not considered when calculating times for this field.

300 $a 5 videodiscs (561 min.) : $b sd., col. ; $c 4 3/4 in.
300 $a 1 videodisc (1 hr., 19 min.) : $b sd., col. ; $c 4 3/4 in.

If you think times for the supplementary material may be important to you patrons, put this information in the same 500 note used to described the that material:

500 $a Bonus features: making Game of thrones (27 min.); character profiles (15 clips); creating the Dothraki language; seven audio commentaries with cast and crew.

The Running Time fixed field (labeled “Time” on the grid) is a 3-digit number reflecting the length of the videorecording in minutes. Like the time given in the 300 field, it reflects the playing time only for the title given in the 245 field. This means, of course, that the time given in the Running Time fixed field must match the 300 field.

When recording information in the Running Time fixed field, follow these rules:

  • If the running time is less that 100 minutes, include the leading zero (039 for 39 minutes).
  • If the time is more that 999 minutes, enter three zeros (000).
  • If the time is unknown, enter three hyphens (—), not zeros.

Remember to always check videorecording MARC records to make sure the times given in the 300 field and Time fixed fields match!

More information about the Running Time fixed field can be found at OCLC: Fixed Fields: Time.
Originally published on March 23, 2012.


Tip #109: Blu-ray Cataloging reminders in Evergreen Indiana

More Evergreen libraries are expanding their videorecording collections to include Blu-ray discs.
Blu-ray videorecordings are cataloged much the same way as DVDs, with some important differences in the 007, 250 and 538 fields.

  1. The fifth space (or fourth letter) in the 007 physical characteristics field is always an ‘s’, to indicate a Blu-ray disc. (Although in Evergreen all the coding in the 007 field is strung together, in vendor records such as OCLC this position is viewed as subfield e.)
    Example:

    007 __ vd csaizq (for a Blu-ray disc)
    007 __ vd cvaizq (for a DVD)
  2. To help patrons spot a Blu-ray videorecording in the OPAC, catalogers should always add “Blu-ray version” to the 250 edition statement. If the exact words “Blu-ray edition” or “Blu-ray version” do not appear on the item or container, put the statement in brackets.
    Examples:

    250 __ [Blu-ray version]
    250 __ Blu-ray version.
    250 __ Special ed., [Blu-ray version]
  3. The 538 system details note is for a Blu-ray videorecording always identifies the material as a Blu-ray disc and advises that a special player is required.

    Example:

    538 __ Blu-ray disc, widescreen presentation; Dolby Digital, 1080p High Definition; requires Blu-ray player.

—Since DVDs and Blu-ray discs do not play on the same type of equipment and are formatted differently, they cannot share the same MARC record. Please do not attach a Blu-ray videorecording to a DVD record.
—The GMD for Blu-ray is [videorecording], the same as for a DVD. Do not use a GMD of [Blu-ray] in the 245 field.

Combo packs: If you receive the DVD and Blu-ray versions bundled together in a set, we suggest you repackage and circulate them separately so each can be attached to the correct MARC record. If each format does not have a unique ISBN, use the set ISBN and/or UPC code on both records but use subfield ‘z’ instead of ‘a’ in the 020 and 024 fields. Otherwise the two records may merge if a future deduplication project includes videorecordings.

More information about cataloging Blu-ray discs and Blu-ray/DVD combo packages can be found on pages 2.37 – 2.40 of the EI Cataloging Procedures Guide.
Originally published on November 11, 2011.


Tip #103: Book measurements in the 300 field

If not already in the MARC record, be sure to add the dimensions of a book in the 300 field, subfield c. This information is often missing in a CIP or on-order record.

Book dimensions are always given in centimeters.

When measuring the size of the book being cataloged, always round up to the higher centimeter rather than rounding down to the lower one. If a book measures 24.1 centimeters on your ruler, the height of the books should be recorded as 25 cm. in the 300 subfield c. (The reasoning behind this cataloging rule is the following: If the library’s book shelves are set at 24 centimeters, a book measuring 24.1 centimeters would not fit on the shelf. It would have to be shelved in a location where the book shelves were set at 25 centimeters or higher. )

The first dimension given is always the height of the book. Include the binding in the measurement.

Example: 300 __ |a 328 p. ; |c 22 cm.

Subfield c is always preceded by a semicolon.

If the width of the book is greater than the height, or if the width of the book is less than half of the height, give both the height and width in subfield c.

Examples:

300 __ |a vi, 186 p. ; |c 18 x 27 cm.
300 __ |a 467 p. : |b col. ill. ; |c 22 x 9 cm.

Originally published on September 30, 2011.


Tip #82: Punctuation and subfield reminders for the 300 field

Catalogers often have to complete or correct the 300 field when importing and editing MARC records. This is especially true when working with CIP records, which do not include the physical description. Catalogers need to pay attention to subfields and punctuation when adding information to the 300 field.

Physical details such as illustrations, charts and maps, dimensions, and accompanying material information belong in their own subfields, not all together in subfield a. Also, each subfield is preceded by specific punctuation:

  • Subfield b is always preceded by a colon (: ‡b)
  • Subfield c is always preceded by a semicolon (; ‡c)
  • Subfield e is always preceded by a plus sign (+ ‡e)

Notice that the type of punctuation is determined by the subfield that comes after the punctuation, not the subfield in which the punctuation actually appears. This means that whether a colon or semicolon is used at the end of subfield ‘a’ is determined by whether or not it is followed by a subfield ‘b’.

Here are some examples:

300 ‡a272 p. : ‡bcol. ill., col. maps ; ‡c28 cm. (A colon is used after the pagination because it is followed by a subfield b)
300 ‡a548 p. ; ‡c28 cm. (A semicolon is used after the pagination because it is followed by a subfield c)
300 ‡axvi, 338 p. : ‡bill. ; ‡c24 cm. + ‡e1 sound disc (digital ; 4 3/4 in.)

Be sure to leave a space before the punctuation mark. Example: 28 p. (space) : ‡bgeneal. table (space) ; ‡c24 cm.

If you note maps, plates, charts, or other physical details in the 300, don’t forget to code them in the Ills (illustrations) Fixed Field.
Originally published on April 29, 2011.


Tip #42: Unnumbered pages and multiple number sequences in books

If your book contains multiple number sequences, record the last number in each sequence.

300 |a 320 p.
300 |a xxi, 176 p.
300 |a 248, 16 p.
300 |a 18 p., 300 leaves

If a sequence continues beyond the last numbered page, ignore those additional pages unless the unnumbered pages are referred to elsewhere in a note field, such as bibliographic information or a reading group guide.

Example: There is an interview with the author at the end of your book, after the printed page numbers stop, and you have referred to this in a 500 note. Although the last numbered page is 357, you would add the 6 pages beyond the last numbered one and record [363] in brackets in the 300 field. Important: Any time you record a number in the 300 field that is not actually printed on your book, it must be in brackets.

300 |a xv, [363] p.
500 |a Includes a reading group guide (p. [358-363]).

Ignore an unnumbered sequence unless it is referred to elsewhere in a note field.

An excerpt from another book should be considered a separate sequence. Sometimes the pages are numbered. However, if they are not and you refer to the excerpt in a note field, count the pages and include them in the 300 field as an additional sequence. If you don’t refer to the excerpt in a note field, just ignore the sequence if the pages aren’t numbered.

300 |a 430, [16] p. (pages for the excerpt not numbered in your book)
300 |a 430, 16 p. (pages for the excerpt are numbered in your book)
500 |a Includes an excerpt from The hero of ages.

If the whole book is unnumbered, do this:

300 |a 1 v. (unpaged)

However, if you think the number of pages is important to your patrons, count the pages and put the number in brackets:

300 |a [32] p.

Remember, anytime you record a number in the 300 field that is not printed on your resource, it must be in brackets.
Originally published on July 2, 2010.


Tip #6: Measuring Books

When measuring the size of the book being cataloged, you should always round up to the higher centimeter rather than rounding down to the lower one. If a book measures 24.1 centimeters on your ruler, the height of the books should be recorded as 25 cm. in the 300 subfield c.
The reasoning behind this cataloging rule is the following: If the library’s book shelves are set at 24 centimeters, a book measuring 24.1 centimeters would not fit on the shelf. It would have to be shelved in a location where the book shelves were set at 25 centimeters or higher.
Originally published on October 2, 2009.



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