Archive for the ‘Authors’ Category

Tip #174: Statement of Responsibility (245 subfield c) in an RDA record

In RDA, there is no “rule of three” like there is in AACR2. The general RDA rule is to transcribe a statement of responsibility in the form in which it appears, including the titles and honorifics. Record persons, families, and corporate bodies.

However, if more than three names are listed as performing the same responsibility or the same degree of responsibility, RDA also gives the option to omit all but the first name and summarize what has been omitted with words such as [and 4 others] in brackets. (Don’t use [et al.] or “…” in RDA.) For instance, if more than 3 authors are listed and none are singled out as the primary author, then you can omit as many names as you wish, so long as you list the first name. If there are four producers and five writers listed on a resource, you must list one producer and one writer but the rest of the names are optional. However, if only two or three persons, families, or corporate bodies share a responsibility, then all names must be included.

The Evergreen Indiana RDA cataloging guideline recently agreed upon by the EI Cataloging Committee is to accept the existing statement of responsibility as found, so long as it meets the guidelines above, but add more names and information to the record if desired. Please don’t delete any part of the existing statement, but add names and titles if you believe they are important and could be of interest to our patrons. So if you import an RDA record with a statement of responsibility listing 4 of the 6 authors, you can leave the record as is or enhance it by adding the omitted authors.

Examples of RDA statements of responsibility (field 245, subfield c):

|c by Elliott Golding [and six others].
|c Sally Katz, Betty Jones, Thomas Rice [and two others]
|c Hollywood Pictures ; produced by Clint Eastwood [and four others] ; written by Ken Roberts and Robert Kent [and two others] ; directed by Billy Jones.
|c by General Colin Powell.
|c by Queen Elizabeth.
|c by retired Corporal John James.
|c Richard Evans Schultes, Edward C. Jeffrey Professor of Biology and Director of the Botanical Museum, Harvard University, and William A. Davis, Keeper of Scientific Exhibits, Botanical Museum, Harvard University, with Hillel Burger, Chief Photographer, Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University.
|c sponsored by the America Library Association.
|c by the late Reverend John Hughes.

Originally published on April 5, 2013.


Tip #131: Multiple authors & the ‘Rule of Three’

If your resource lists three or fewer authors on the title page:

  • the first named person or corporate body is the main entry and appears in the 1xx field
  • the first indicator in the 245 field is a 1
  • each of the other authors are added entries appearing in 7xx fields

Example:

Title: Volunteer vacations : short-term adventures that will benefit you and others (by) Bill McMillon, Doug Cutchins, and Anne Geissinger.
100 1_ a| McMillon, Bill, |d 1942-
245 10 a| Volunteer vacations : |b short-term adventures that will benefit you and others / |c Bill McMillon, Doug Cutchins, and Anne Geissinger.
700 1_ a| Cutchins, Doug.
700 1_ a| Geissinger, Anne.

However, if there are more than three authors and principal responsibility is not attributed to anyone:

  • there is no 1xx field
  • the title is the main entry (245 field, first indicator 0)
  • only the first author listed on the title page is named in the statement of responsibility (245, subfield c): “Joe Jones … [et al.].”
  • there is an added entry (7xx) only for the first named person or body responsible.

Example:

Title: American Icon: the fall of Roger Clemens and the rise of steroids in America’s pastime (by) Teri Thompson, Nathaniel Vinton, Michael O’Keeffe, and Christian Red.
(no 100 field)
245 00 a| American icon : |b the fall of Roger Clemens and the rise of steroids in America’s pastime / |c Teri Thompson … [et al.].
700 1_ a| Thompson, Teri.

Sometimes there are more than 3 authors but one is singled out as the primary contributor. One name may be in larger print, bold type, or separated from the other authors by the word “with”, as in “Thomas Patterson with Margaret Robinson, Sarah Rice, and Timothy Hubert”. In these cases, the primary author’s name goes in a 100 field and the rest belong in 700 fields. Of course, if there’s more than three secondary authors, list the first one followed by the .[et al.] and only put that name in a 700.
Originally published on April 27, 2012.


Tip #127: Watch the first indicator in the 100 field

It’s important to pay attention to the first indicator of the 100 field, especially with non-English names. We’re used to names being in last name, first name order in this field, but that is not always the case.

If the first indicator is a 0 instead of the usual 1, that means that the name is in direct order. This is important to recognize when you’re creating call numbers and spine labels.

Examples:

100 0_ $a Arnaldur Indriðason, $d 1961-
245 10 $a Hypothermia / $c Arnaldur Indridason ; translated by Victoria Cribb.

100 0_ $a Yrsa Sigurðardóttir.
245 10 $a Last rituals / $c Yrsa Sigurdardóttir ; translated from the Icelandic by Bernard Scudder.

100 1_ $a Perry, Anne.
245 10 $a Dorchester Terrace / $c Anne Perry.

Originally published on March 30, 2012.


Tip #125: Checking the Authority Record for the 100 field

Sometimes the author’s name on a book is in a slightly different form or is spelled differently than it appears in the 100 field of the MARC record. That’s because the 100 field contains the author’s name in the form established in the national authority file, which does not necessarily correspond with how the author or publisher decide to note the author’s name on the book.

This variance is often found with with Asian names and names from other languages using different alphabets. There are specific rules used for transliterating names from other alphabets into our alphabet.

Using the name from the authority file ensures that all the author’s books are connected in the catalog, even when the name is listed differently on different works. Using the authorized name on the spine label ensures that works by that author are grouped together on the shelf.

The name in the 245 field should always match the title page, but the 100 field may or may not match what is in the book.

If you are concerned that the 100 field might not be correct, or if you are originally cataloging a work, look up the name in the authority files on the Library of Congress Authorities website. The procedure is essentially the same as for searching for authorized series names (see Tip #123) except select “Name Authority Headings” as the search type. Try the help function if you have trouble with your search. When you get to the authority file, the authorized name will be in the 100 field. The 400 fields contain ‘see references’ which are the names associated with the author but not the established name that belongs in the 100 field. If you typed in a name that is not the authorized name, you’ll see the name you typed in one of these fields. When you copy the name from the 100 field into your record, be sure to also copy the indicator and any subfields.

Examples:

100 1 $a Sin, Kyŏng-suk.
245 10 $a Please look after mom / $c Kyung-sook Shin ; translated from the Korean by Chi-Young Kim.

100 1 $a Ōkami, Mineko.
245 10 $a Dragon Knights. $n Volume 2 / $c Mineko Ohkami.

Originally published on March 16, 2012.


Tip #119: Names with multiple initials – space or no space?

Question: When creating or editing MARC records, is it J.K. Rowling or J. K. Rowling? Is it Rowling, J.K. or Rowling, J.K.?

Answer:
In the 100, 700, or 800 field, always enter a space between initials of a personal name: Rowling, J. K.
In the 245 field, type the name with no spaces between initials: J.K. Rowling.

Examples:

100 1_ |a Griffin, W. E. B. (spaces between initials)
245 14 |a The traffickers / |c W.E.B. Griffin and William E. Butterworth IV. (no spaces)
100 1_ |a Beaton, M. C. (spaces between initials)
245 14 |a There goes the bride / |c M.C. Beaton (no spaces)

In contrast, never put spaces between initials of a corporate name, no matter where it appears in the record.

Example:

110 2_ |a J.C. Penney. (no spaces)
260 __ |a New York : |b W.W. Norton, |c 2001. (no spaces)

The basic rule in a nutshell: Anytime a personal or corporate name is in direct order, there are no spaces between the initials. If the format is last name, first name, then put a space between the initials.
Originally published on February 3, 2012.


Tip #88: Statement of Responsibility for DVDs

The credits on a DVD container can go on forever, so catalogers have to decide whose name gets to go in the 245 subfield c and who winds up in the 508 note field when cataloging DVDs.

The general rule is that the director, producer and writer/screenwriter go in the statement of responsibility. However, if someone else has a major role in creating the film, such as the director of animation for an animated film, the songwriter for musicals, or the choreographer for ballet, they can also be included in the 245. The sponsor (‘Moneybags Inc. presents’) and production company (‘an XYZ production’) are assumed to have creative responsibility so they belong in the 245, too. The production company and, if applicable, sponsor are listed first, followed by the directors, producers, and writers in the order given on the source. Companies and individuals listed in the 245 should be traced with a 7xx field.

Anyone with creative input other than the cast that seems important can be put in a 508 (Credit Note). Don’t include everyone else who is listed on the container, just the more important. For instance, list the director of photography but not the camera operators. Names appearing in a 508 are not usually traced.
The ‘Rule of Three’ applies to the 245 field: if more than 3 persons or bodies perform the same function, list only the first followed by ‘…[et al.]’. If the others listed are well known and you think should be included in the record, you can put them in the 508. The ‘Rule of Three’ doesn’t apply to the 508 field.
The cast members whose names dominate the list on the container go in the 511 field (Performer Note). Narrators and hosts go in this field, also. If you’re listing cast members, the first indicator is a 1, if listing narrators or hosts, use a 0.

In the bib record, the 511 field appears above the 508. (They are not in numerical order.)

See Tip of the Week #14 (Nov. 2009) for a 5xx field order cheat sheet for DVDs.
Originally published on June 10, 2011.


Tip #85:Statement of Responsibility (245 subfield c) for Books

Always transcribe the Statement of Responsibility exactly as it appears on the the chief source of information. When cataloging books, this is almost always the title page.

If the title page says, for instance, “by Elizabeth Peters”, then enter “by Elizabeth Peters” in the 245.
If the title page just says “Elizabeth Peters”, please do not add the word “by” in the 245.
Here are some other pointers about the Statement of Responsibility:

  • Include only statements of responsibility regarding the artistic or intellectual content. Don’t include consultants or market analysts, for example.
  • If more than one Statement of Responsibility appears on the title page, for different functions such as a writer and editor or writer and illustrator, transcribe them in the order they appear and separate each function with a space-semicolon-space. Example: “by Susan Brockman ; foreward by Elliott Mason ; illustrated by Michael Ison”.
  • If needed, add wording about the type of responsibility involved (editor, photographer, etc.) but put the wording in brackets. Examples: “by Maxine Edwards and [illustrated by] Doug Fissel”, or “[edited by] Bob Rowlings”.
  • If a statement of responsibility appears someplace other than the title page, such as the cover or spine, you can put it in the 245 but enclose it in brackets and add a 500 note to explain where the information came from.

Don’t forget subfield c of the 245 field is always preceded by a forward slash.

In general, don’t include titles (Dr., PhD, etc.) or qualifications (Director of English Studies). However, there are some exceptions. For instance, keep the ‘Dr.’ in front of Dr. Seuss because skipping it would just leave a surname, and keep titles if they are noble ones or a British term of honor.

Include any suffix indicating relationship, such as “Jr.”, “Sr.”, and “IV”.

Transcribe a Statement of Responsibility even if no person is named. Examples: “by the editors of Time”, or “translated from the German”.

Don’t forget to apply the “rule of 3”: If more than 3 people are listed for the same function and all are given equal billing, give only the first person and “…[et al.].” This means if the book was “edited by Bill Rogers, Tim Bullock, William Reed, and Margaret Manning”, the record would read “edited by Bill Rogers …[et al.]. However, if the title page was phrased “edited by Bill Rogers with Tim Bullock, William Reed, and Margaret Manning, the Statement of Responsibility would be transcribed as it appears on the title page.
Originally published on May 20, 2011.


Tip #54: Author’s names in the 100 field

The 100 field contains the author’s name in the form established in the national authority file. With Asian names and names from other languages using different alphabets, these are often different than the form listed on the book because there are specific rules used for transliterating names from other alphabets into our alphabet. Using the name from the authority file ensures that all the author’s books are connected in the catalog, even when the name is listed differently on different works. Using the authorized name on the spine label ensures that works by that author are grouped together on the shelf.

The name in the 245 field should always match the title page, but the 100 field may or may not match what is in the book.

If you are concerned that the 100 field might not be correct, you can look up the name in the authority files on the Library of Congress Authorities website. Be sure to select ‘Name Authority Headings’ as the search type.
Originally published on September 24, 2010.


Tip #11: Multiple Authors

If there are three or fewer authors:

  • the first named person or corporate body is the main entry and appears in the 1xx field
  • each of the other authors are added entries appearing in 7xx fields

Example title: Volunteer vacations : short-term adventures that will benefit you and others (by) Bill McMillon, Doug Cutchins, and Anne Geissinger.

100 1_ a| McMillon, Bill, |d 1942-
245 10 a| Volunteer vacations : |b short-term adventures that will benefit you and others / |c Bill McMillon, Doug Cutchins, and Anne Geissinger.
700 1_ a| Cutchins, Doug.
700 1_ a| Geissinger, Anne.

If there are more than three authors and principal responsibility is not attributed to anyone:

  • there is no 1xx field
  • the title is the main entry (245 field, first indicator 0)
  • only the first author listed on the title page is named in the statement of responsibility (245, subfield c): “Joe Jones … [et al.].”
  • there is an added entry (7xx) only for the first named person or body responsible.

Example title: American Icon: the fall of Roger Clemens and the rise of steroids in America’s pastime (by) Teri Thompson, Nathaniel Vinton, Michael O’Keeffe, and Christian Red.

(no 100 field)
245 00 a| American icon : |b the fall of Roger Clemens and the rise of steroids in America’s pastime / |c Teri Thompson … [et al.].
700 1_ a| Thompson, Teri.

Originally published on November 6, 2009.


Tip #10: Author Initials

Is it M. C. Beaton or M.C. Beaton?

When typing the author’s name in the 100 field, always enter a space between the initials.

Do not put spaces between initials in personal or corporate names in the descriptive part of the record, such as the 245 field.

Examples:

100 1_ |a Beaton, M. C. (space between initials)
245 10 |a There goes the bride / M.C. Beaton. (no space between initials)

100 1_ |a Griffin, W. E. B. (spaces)
245 14 |a The traffickers / |c W.E.B. Griffin and William E. Butterworth IV. (no spaces)

100 1_ |a Doctorow, E. L. |d 1931- (spaces)
245 1_ |a Homer & Langley : |b a novel / |c E.L. Doctorow. (no spaces)


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