Archive for the ‘Punctuation’ Category

Tip #181: Bibliographic References (504 field)

Sections of a book titled “Notes”, “Selected Bibliography”, and “Bibliographic Sources” are all considered bibliographic references. Sections called “Other Resources” or “Sources of More Information” or lists of where the reader can find crafting supplies are really not bibliographic references but catalogers often include these. If they are already in the record as a bibliographic resource, leave them but do not add these types of references in the 504. Technically, ‘bibliographic references’ means a list of the sources that the writer consulted or cited.

Record information about bibliographic references in the 504 field. This field can also be used for discographies and filmographies. If your item also has an index, include this information in the 504 rather than a separate 500 index note.

Always add pagination unless the bibliographic references are dispersed throughout the work. Put the page numbers in parentheses and bracket numbers that do not actually appear on the page.

CIP (cataloging in publication) records often have incorrect or missing information about bibliographic references and indexes, so it’s important to check these carefully. Pagination will not be included in a CIP record and will have to be added.

The 504 field ends in a period, even if the note ends in a bracket or parenthesis. There are no indicators, and all information may be put in subfield a.

Any information in the record about bibliographic references and indexes must be reflected in the Fixed Fields. If you add or remove information about bibliographic references and/or indexes in the variable fields, make sure to also change the fixed fields grid.

  • If your item has an index, then the Indx (Index) fixed field is coded ‘1’. (If there is no index, this field is ‘0’.)
  • If your item contains bibliographic information, then the Cont (Nature of Contents) field must contain a ‘b’ (bibliographies), ‘k’ (discographies), and/or ‘q’ (filmographies). Up to four codes may be used in the Cont field, in alphabetical order.

Examples:

500 Includes index. (Indx is 1)

504 Includes bibliographic references (p. 299-304). (Indx is 0, Cont is b)

504 Includes bibliographic references (p. [504]-511) and index. (Indx is 1, Cont is b)

504 Includes discography (p. 311) and index. (Indx is 1, Cont is k)

504 Includes bibliographic references (p. 405-421) and filmography (p. 422). (Indx is 0, Cont is bq)

Originally published on May 24, 2013.


Tip #177: Using (and not using) brackets in an RDA record

In the Statement of Responsibility (245 |c): In AACR2, any part of the statement of responsibility that was not taken from the chief source of information had to be placed in brackets and the source given in a 500 note field. In RDA, you only need to use the brackets if the statement of responsibility is taken from someplace other than the resource itself. The preferred source for the statement of responsibility is the source of the title proper, but you can also get the information from elsewhere on the resource and still not have to put the statement in brackets or reference the source in a 500 note field.

If supplying a date of publication or production (264 |c): If the publication or production date is not clearly stated on the resource, you can ‘supply’ the date, if you’re sure of it, and put it in brackets.

Example:

264 _1 |a New York : |b Harper, |c [2013]

When describing unnumbered pages in the 300 field: Do not use brackets when noting pagination. Instead, use the words “unnumbered pages”
Example:

300 __ |a 174 pages, 16 unnumbered pages of plates : |b illustrations, maps; |c 25 cm

When supplying series numeration not found on the resource (490 |v): Continue to put this information in brackets, just like in AACR2, and add a 500 note identifying the source.
Example:

490 1_ |a A home repair is homicide mystery ; |v [16]

Originally published on April 26, 2013.


Tip #173: Ending punctuation in the 300 field of a RDA record in Evergreen Indiana

Field 300 may end in no punctuation, may end in a right parenthesis, or may end in a period when either the last element is an abbreviation (“cm” and “mm” are not treated as abbreviations) or a 490 field is present in the record.

We never used to have to think much about the ISBD rules for this field until RDA because most 300 fields ended with a period anyway (the abbreviation “cm.” or “in.”). However, ‘cm’ is not considered an abbreviation in RDA, so now we have to be careful.

Examples:

300 __ 287 pages : |b color illustrations ; |c 24 cm (no 490, so no period)

300 __ 12 sound discs (approximately 14 hrs.) : |b digital ; |c 4 ¾ in. (490 may or may not be present- it doesn’t matter here)

300 __ 821 pages, 16 unnumbered pages of plates : |b illustrations ; |c 25 cm. (period because a 490 field is present)
490 1_ World at war

300 __ 1 sound disc : |b digital ; |c 4 ¾ in. + |e 1 booklet (no 490, so no period)

300 __ 338 pages ; |c 30 cm + |e 1 sound disc (digital ; 4 ¾ in.). (490 present)
490 1_ Senior fitness guides

Note: Abbreviations for duration and dimensions are allowed in RDA.

The reasoning behind this period/no period business has to do with areas of description in an ISBD display. Because the series statement and physical description are part of the same ‘paragraph’, a period is needed after the 300 to separate it from the 490 in the display. If there is no 490 field, then the 300 field is in a paragraph by itself and needs no ending punctuation.
Originally published on March 29, 2013.


Tip #172: RDA Punctuation

It was decided at the last EI Cataloging Committee meeting not to use RDA punctuation in bibliographic records but to continue to follow ISBD standards. This is an option available in RDA cataloging, and means we can continue to follow our current punctuation rules.

This decision also means if you see RDA style punctuation in a record, it should be changed to ISBD standards. The most common correction you will need to make is to remove the ‘double punctuation’ in some 245 and 250 fields.

Examples:

245 00 |a What happened to Jane?.
245 10 |a Physics for beginners / |c Robert Jones, Jr..
250 __ |a Revised and expanded!.

In each case, the ending period should be deleted.
Originally published on March 22, 2013.


Tip #144: Punctuation reminders for the 300 field

Punctuation between the subfields in the 300 field is determined by the subfield that follows the punctuation, not the subfield where the punctuation is actually located. This means that subfield “a” may end in either a colon or a semicolon, depending on whether or not it is followed by a subfield “b”.

Here are the rules:

  • Subfield b is always preceded by a colon (: ‡b)
  • Subfield c is always preceded by a semicolon ( ; ‡c)
  • Subfield e is always preceded by a plus sign (+ ‡e)

Some examples:

300 ‡a 272 p. : ‡b col. ill., col. maps ; ‡c 28 cm. (A colon is used after the pagination because it is followed by a subfield b)
300 ‡a 548 p. ; ‡c 28 cm. (A semicolon is used after the pagination because it is followed by a subfield c)
300 ‡a xvi, 338 p. : ‡b ill. ; ‡c24 cm. + ‡e 1 sound disc (digital ; 4 3/4 in.)

Reminders:

  • Be sure to leave a space before the punctuation mark. Example: 28 p. (space) : ‡b geneal. table (space) ; ‡c 24 cm.
  • If you note maps, plates, charts, or other physical details in the 300, don’t forget to code them in the Ills (illustrations) Fixed Field.

Originally published on August 3, 2012.


Tip #141: Ending Punctuation Cheat Sheet

Can’t remember if a field needs a period? Don’t know if a period is needed after a set of brackets? Here’s a cheat sheet to help.

Ending Punctuation Cheat Sheet

Note: A mark of punctuation is a period (.), a question mark (?), an exclamation mark (!), or a hyphen (-).

Field 020 does not end in a period.
Field 028 does not end in a period.
Field 1xx ends with a mark of punctuation or a closing parenthesis.
Field 245 ends with a period, even when another mark of punctuation is present, unless the last word in the field has its own punctuation, such as an abbreviation, initial/letter, or data that ends with a period.
Field 246 does not end in a mark of punctuation unless the final word has its own period, such as an abbreviation, initial/letter, or data that ends in a period.
Field 250 ends in a period, even if there’s and ending parenthesis or bracket.
Field 260 ends with a mark of punctuation, a closing parenthesis, or a closing bracket.
Field 300 ends with a period if there is a 490 field. If no 490, then the 300 ends with a mark of punctuation or a closing parenthesis.
Field 490 does not end in a mark of punctuation unless the final word has its own.
Field 500 ends with a mark of punctuation. A period follows an ending parenthesis or bracket. If the note is a quoted note, the period should be inside the ending quotation mark.
Field 504 ends with a mark of punctuation. A period follows an ending parenthesis or bracket.
Field 505 ends with a mark of punctuation. A period follows an ending parenthesis or bracket. However, if the note is incomplete or continues in another 505 field, there is no ending punctuation unless the final word has its own.
Field 508 ends with a mark of punctuation. A period follows an ending parenthesis or bracket.
Field 511 ends with a mark of punctuation. A period follows an ending parenthesis or bracket.
Field 520 ends with a mark of punctuation. A period follows an ending parenthesis or bracket.
Field 521 ends with a mark of punctuation. A period follows an ending parenthesis or bracket.
Field 538 ends with a mark of punctuation. A period follows an ending parenthesis or bracket.
Field 6xx ends with a mark of punctuation or a closing parenthesis. However, if the final subfield is |2, |3, or |4, the mark of punctuation precedes it.
Field 7xx ends with a mark of punctuation or a closing parenthesis. However, if the final subfield is |3, or |4, the mark of punctuation precedes it.
Field 8xx ends with a mark of punctuation or a closing parenthesis. However, if the final subfield is |3, or |4, the mark of punctuation precedes it.

Field 245 examples:

245 00 |a Dark shadows |h[videorecording].
245 10 |a Where’s Waldo?.
245 14 |a The life of Susan B.

Field 250 example:

250 __ |a [Blu-Ray version].
250 __ |a Library ed.

Field 655 example:

655 _7 |a Audiobooks. |2 lcgft

Originally published on July 13, 2012.


Tip #137: Capitalization in the 245 field

When entering a title in the 245 field, capitalize only the first word and proper names.

245 10 |a Guide to medicinal herbs
245 14 |a The private world of Georgette Heyer
245 14 |a The pirates of Somalia : |b inside their hidden world

This rule, however, is not as simple as it first appears. The ‘first word’ does not just mean the first word in the 245 |a, and ‘proper name’ is more complicated than just the name of a familiar place or a person’s name.

Capitalizing the first word in a title means capitalizing not just the first word of the title proper, but also the first word of any alternative, parallel, or quoted title that appears in the 245.

245 12 |a A gentleman of fortune, or, The suspicions of Miss Dido Kent
245 10 |a Readings from Leaves of grass
245 10 |a William Shakespeare’s The tempest
245 00 |a Como agua para chocolate |h [videorecording] = |b Like water for chocolate

Exception: If the first word of a title is preceded by a dash, do not capitalize.

245 10 |a -and they all lived happily ever after

If the 245 contains subfields ‘n’ or ‘p’ (for the name or number of a part or section), capitalize the first word in these subfields.

245 00 |a Deadliest catch. |n Season 6

Do not capitalize the first word of a general material designation (GMD)

245 10 |a South of Broad |h [sound recording]

Do capitalize governmental bodies, imaginary places, and political parties.

245 10 |a My life among the Democrats
245 10 |a Lost islands of Witch World
245 12 |a A soldier of the First Infantry Division

When editing a record, be careful not to change a word to lower case unless you’re sure it’s not a proper name. Sometimes it’s hard to tell.

245 10 |a Return to Harmony

Below are some of the rules regarding personal names. See Appendix A of the AACR2 for other capitalization rules.

  • Capitalize any title or term of honor or address that immediately precedes a personal name: Queen Elizabeth; President Obama; Senator Gifford.
  • Do not capitalize civil and military titles that does not precede a personal name: George Bush, president of the United States; John Roberts, chief justice of the Supreme Court; the U.S. Army chief of staff.
  • Capitalize titles of royalty or nobility even when not used with a particular person: Duke of Wellington; Prince of Wales.
  • Capitalize religious titles: Cardinal Richards; the Dalai Lama.
  • Capitalize a term of honor or respect: His Holiness; Her Royal Highness.

Originally published on June 15, 2012.


Tip #133: Dashes in the Title Proper (245 field)

Dashes are used in the 245 field to replace punctuation that could be confused with punctuation required by cataloging rules, such as colons and ellipsis. Whether or not you leave a space before or after a dash depends on what punctuation the dash is replacing.

If your title contains a colon that does NOT mean that what follows is a subtitle, replace the colon with either a dash or a comma. When using dashes to replace a colon, there are no spaces before or after the dash.

Example:

The title page reads: “Wanted: Dead or Alive”.
245 10 |a Wanted–dead or alive / |c Susan Lagrange. OR
245 10 |a Wanted, dead or alive / |c Susan Lagrange.

If your title contains an ellipsis that is not associated with the “.et al.” phrase, also replace this with a dash. In this case, leave a space after the dash but not before it unless the ellipsis is at the beginning of the title.

Examples:

Title page reads: “How to Do the Right Thing… and Live with the Consequences”.
245 10 |a How to do the right thing– and live with the consequences / |c by Robert Longwatch.

Title page reads: “…And So It Goes”
245 10 |a –and so it goes / |c Margaret Storm. (Note that the first word isn’t capitalized.)

Originally published on May 18, 2012.


Tip #128: Adding 246 fields to help patrons locate materials

The 246 field of the MARC record contains varying forms of the title of a work. If a title contains elements such as abbreviations, contractions, compound words, symbols, or numbers, catalogers can use this field to increase the odds that a patron will be able to locate the material in the Evergreen database.
The 246 field is repeatable, so add as many 246 tags as you think are needed. Don’t get too carried away, though. The general rule is to focus on the first 5 words of the title. It’s not necessary to add a 246 for every possible combination.

Always omit any leading articles (A, An, or The) since there is no indicator in the 246 to alert the system about nonfiling characters.

Unlike the 245 field, the 246 does not end with a period. If subfields are used, such as b, n, or p, be sure to precede the subfield with the correct punctuation.

The first indicator in these examples is a 3, which means the field is indexed (searchable) but not displayed. Since the 246 field simply repeats what is in the title proper in a varying form, there is no need to display it. The second indicator is blank since we’re just spelling out abbreviations and numbers or repeating the same title in a slightly varied form.

Some examples of when to use a 246 field

  • Add a 246 to spell out abbreviations:
    245 10 |a Magic Pickle vs. the Egg Poacher
    246 3   |a Magic Pickle verses the Egg Poacher

    245 10 |a St. Albans fire
    246 3   |a Saint Albans fire
  • If there are letters or initials with separating punctuation (hyphens, slashes, periods), add a 246 without the separating punctuation:
    245 10 |a Raising chickens as easy as A-B-C
    246 3   |a Raising chickens as easy as ABC
  • If there is an ampersand (&) in the title proper, add a 246 replacing it with the word “and”.
    245 1   |a Jack & Jill
    246 3   |a Jack and Jill
  • If there are Roman numerals in a title proper, add a 246 with the Arabic numbers and another with the spelled out form:
    245 14 |a The brave men of World War II
    246 3   |a Brave men of World War 2
    246 3   |a Brave men of World War two
  • If there are Arabic numbers in the 245 field, add a title added entry for the spelled out version. If the title proper contains a spelled out number, add a 246 for the Arabic one:
    245 10 |a 526 poems
    246 3   |a Five hundred twenty-six poems.
    245 14 |a The first ten years of freedom

    246 3   |a First 10 years of freedom
    245 10 |a Bob’s #1 herbal cure
    246 3   |a Bob’s number one herbal cure
  • If your patrons search for television shows by season, you may want to add 246 fields for the alternative ways of expressing the season numeration:
    245 14 |a The golden girls. |n The complete second season
    246 3   |a Golden girls. |n The complete 2nd season
    246 3   |a Golden girls. |n Season 2
  • If a title word could have an alternative form, add a 246 if you think a patron might search by it:
    245 10 |a Knitwit
    246 3   |a Knit wit

    245 10 |a Braveheart
    246 3   |a Brave Heart
  • Add a 246 to spell out contractions:
    245 10 |a Don’t tell mom
    246 3   |a Do not tell mom
  • If there are signs or symbols in one of the first 5 words of a title proper, add a title added entry for the spelled out version:
    245 10 |a Information @ your fingertips
    246 3   |a Information at your fingertips

A note about dates: Do not add a 246 spelling out a date. However, if a year is expressed in Roman numerals, add a 246 using the Arabic form.
Originally published on April 5, 2012.


Tip #119: Names with multiple initials – space or no space?

Question: When creating or editing MARC records, is it J.K. Rowling or J. K. Rowling? Is it Rowling, J.K. or Rowling, J.K.?

Answer:
In the 100, 700, or 800 field, always enter a space between initials of a personal name: Rowling, J. K.
In the 245 field, type the name with no spaces between initials: J.K. Rowling.

Examples:

100 1_ |a Griffin, W. E. B. (spaces between initials)
245 14 |a The traffickers / |c W.E.B. Griffin and William E. Butterworth IV. (no spaces)
100 1_ |a Beaton, M. C. (spaces between initials)
245 14 |a There goes the bride / |c M.C. Beaton (no spaces)

In contrast, never put spaces between initials of a corporate name, no matter where it appears in the record.

Example:

110 2_ |a J.C. Penney. (no spaces)
260 __ |a New York : |b W.W. Norton, |c 2001. (no spaces)

The basic rule in a nutshell: Anytime a personal or corporate name is in direct order, there are no spaces between the initials. If the format is last name, first name, then put a space between the initials.
Originally published on February 3, 2012.



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