Archive for the ‘Cheat Sheet’ Category

Tip #179: RDA fields 336, 337, 338 & a cheat sheet

The 336 (Content Type), 337 (Media Type), and 338 (Carrier Type) fields should be included in all RDA records. The 337 field is not core, but is rarely omitted. These fields replace the GMD (245 |h).

  • Content Type (336) is the form of expression. Is it performed music, a cartographic image such as a map, or spoken word such as a downloadable e-book?
  • Media Type (337) is what device (if any) is needed to use the resource. Do you need an audio player, a video player, a microform reader, or nothing?
  • Carrier Type (338) describes the storage medium. Is the music on an audiodisc? Is the movie on a videocassette? Is the document online?
  • The terms used in subfield ‘a’ of these fields are a controlled vocabulary, which means we can’t just make up our own descriptive words. Here’s a link to a cheat sheet for what terms to use for the resource you have.

    Here’s some examples:

    336 __ |a text |2 rdacontent
    337 __ |a unmediated |2 rdamedia
    338 __ |a volume |2 rdacarrier

    336 __ |a performed music |2 rdacontent
    337 __ |a audio |2 rdamedia
    338 __ |a audidisc |2 rdacarrier

    Subfield ‘2’ is just the code for the source of the terms used, which is always going to be the same.

    Note there is no ending punctuation for the 3xx fields.

    A subfield ‘b’ can be used in addition to or instead of subfield ‘a’. The difference is that subfield ‘a’ is the actual term and subfield’ b’ is a code for that term. Evergreen catalogers should use subfield ‘a’ when original cataloging or adding fields 336/337/338. If the record already has these fields and uses subfield ‘b’ rather than ‘a’, it’s okay to leave the record as is.

    If your resource has more than one component, such as a book packaged with a CD or an audiobook with a CD-Rom, you are only required to include the 336/337/338 fields for the primary material. So if you are cataloging a book with a CD inserted in the back, you’ll probably catalog it with the primary material being the book, which means the 336/337/338 fields would reflect text rather than spoken word. However, if you are cataloging a kit or a resource where there is no dominant element, you’ll want to include a 336/337/338 field for each component.
    Originally published on May 10, 2013.


Tip #175: 007 Field Cheat Sheet for Sound Recordings on CD

The 007 field contains coded information about the physical characteristics of the material being cataloged. Evergreen catalogers mainly see 007 fields on bibliographic records for videos, sound recordings, and electronic resources. This field usually does not appear on MARC records for books.

The 007 is a fixed field, which means the contents are position dependent. In Evergreen, the subfield labels (|a, |b, |c, etc.) do not display. There are no indicators for the 007 field.

A typical 007 field for a sound recording looks like this in Evergreen:

007 __ sd fsngnnmmned

Note the space between the ‘d’ and ‘c’. That third position (subfield c) is undefined, so in order to keep all the codes in the correct slot, there has to be a blank space.

Here’s a cheat sheet for coding the 007 field for sound recordings on CD:

Subfield a = s
Subfield b = d
Subfield c = blank space
Subfield d = f
Subfield e = s if stereo; = m if mono; = u if unknown playback configuration
Subfield f = n
Subfield g = g
Subfield h = n
Subfield i = n
Subfield j = m
Subfield k = m
Subfield l = n
Subfield m = e
Subfield n = d if digital storage; = e if analog storage; = u if unknown capture and storage technique
Subfields f, j, k, l, and m are optional, so leaving them blank is okay. Just be sure to leave a blank space for the omitted coding. You can also ‘save’ the space by inserting a |, which means “no attempt to code”. An example of this would be: 007 __ sd fm|gnn|mneu

Originally published on April 12, 2013.


Tip #169: 5xx cheat sheet for DVDs

Cataloging DVDs for Evergreen usually involves moving the 5xx fields around to get them in the correct order. Having a 5xx order ‘cheat sheet’ tucked under your keyboard really helps speed this process.

The list below has been posted in two previous tips, Tip #14 and Tip #95, but it’s useful enough to merit another appearance.

5xx fields for DVDs

538–Format, such as “DVD; region 1; widescreen (1.85:1) presentation; NTSC.”
546–Language and captioning, such as “Language tracks in English, dubbed French or dubbed Spanish, with optional English, French or Spanish subtitles.” or “Closed-captioned.”
500–Source of title proper, if other than the video title frames (the film itself) or physical carrier labels (disc surface). Example: “Title from container.”
500–Notes about variations in the title and parallel titles (Use a 246 field for the actual variant title)
511–Cast, players, performers, narrators, presenters. 1st indicator is a 1 (cast) or 0 (no display constant).
508–Credits: list of persons other than cast who are not listed in the 245. List the function first and separate functions with a semicolon. Example: “Photographers, Carlos Ruiz and Bill Thompson ; Photo editor, Susan Moore.”
500–Edition & history, such as “Originally released as a motion picture in 2009.”, “Based on the novel by __.”, or “Sequel to: ______.”
518–Notes about when and where item was filmed, broadcast, etc., such as “Film on location in Jackson Hole, Wyoming.”
500–Any further publication history and distribution information not in the 260, such as “First released in Canada in 2010.”
500–Physical characteristics of recording, such as sound, color, double-sided. (However, combine with 538 if present)
500–Notes about accompanying material
500–Notes about series information, such as “Series information from container insert.”
521–Audience (MPAA rating). 1st indicator is usually an 8 (no display constant). Also add statements from container such as “Suggested for ages 3-5.”
530–Notes about other formats, such as “Also issued on videocassette.”
520–Summary
500–Descriptive contents note, such as “Special features include…..”
505–Contents
500–Notes about any publisher’s numbers an UPC codes
540–Terms governing use and reproduction
586–Awards note, such as “Academy Award, 2009: Best Picture; Best Director.”
501–“With” notes

Remember, all 5xx fields end with a period.
Originally published on March 1, 2013.


Tip #168: Large print books cheat sheet

A correct Evergreen Indiana MARC record for a large print book contains the following elements:

  • A ‘d’ in the Form fixed field (used for filtered searching)
  • The words ‘large print’ in parentheses following the pagination in the 300 field
  • A genre heading of “Large type books.”

Example:

(AACR2)
245 10 |a Skeleton Hill / |c Peter Lovesey.
300 __ |a 573 p. (large print) ; |c 23 cm.
655 _0 |a Large type books.
Form fixed field = d

(RDA)
245 10 |a No easy day : |b the autobiography of a Navy SEAL : the firsthand account of the mission that killed Osama bin Laden / |c Mark Owen ; with Kevin Maurer.
300 __ |a 381 pages (large print) : |b illustrations (some color), maps ; |c 24 cm
655 _0 |a Large type books.
Form fixed field = d

In Evergreen, a general material designation (GMD) for large print is never used. If you find a GMD for large print in a 245 field, please delete it.

If the item in hand states “large print version” or “large print edition”, add an edition statement in a 250 field:

(AACR2) 250 __ |a Large print ed.
(RDA)     250 __ |a Large print edition.

Originally published on February 22, 2013.


Tip #141: Ending Punctuation Cheat Sheet

Can’t remember if a field needs a period? Don’t know if a period is needed after a set of brackets? Here’s a cheat sheet to help.

Ending Punctuation Cheat Sheet

Note: A mark of punctuation is a period (.), a question mark (?), an exclamation mark (!), or a hyphen (-).

Field 020 does not end in a period.
Field 028 does not end in a period.
Field 1xx ends with a mark of punctuation or a closing parenthesis.
Field 245 ends with a period, even when another mark of punctuation is present, unless the last word in the field has its own punctuation, such as an abbreviation, initial/letter, or data that ends with a period.
Field 246 does not end in a mark of punctuation unless the final word has its own period, such as an abbreviation, initial/letter, or data that ends in a period.
Field 250 ends in a period, even if there’s and ending parenthesis or bracket.
Field 260 ends with a mark of punctuation, a closing parenthesis, or a closing bracket.
Field 300 ends with a period if there is a 490 field. If no 490, then the 300 ends with a mark of punctuation or a closing parenthesis.
Field 490 does not end in a mark of punctuation unless the final word has its own.
Field 500 ends with a mark of punctuation. A period follows an ending parenthesis or bracket. If the note is a quoted note, the period should be inside the ending quotation mark.
Field 504 ends with a mark of punctuation. A period follows an ending parenthesis or bracket.
Field 505 ends with a mark of punctuation. A period follows an ending parenthesis or bracket. However, if the note is incomplete or continues in another 505 field, there is no ending punctuation unless the final word has its own.
Field 508 ends with a mark of punctuation. A period follows an ending parenthesis or bracket.
Field 511 ends with a mark of punctuation. A period follows an ending parenthesis or bracket.
Field 520 ends with a mark of punctuation. A period follows an ending parenthesis or bracket.
Field 521 ends with a mark of punctuation. A period follows an ending parenthesis or bracket.
Field 538 ends with a mark of punctuation. A period follows an ending parenthesis or bracket.
Field 6xx ends with a mark of punctuation or a closing parenthesis. However, if the final subfield is |2, |3, or |4, the mark of punctuation precedes it.
Field 7xx ends with a mark of punctuation or a closing parenthesis. However, if the final subfield is |3, or |4, the mark of punctuation precedes it.
Field 8xx ends with a mark of punctuation or a closing parenthesis. However, if the final subfield is |3, or |4, the mark of punctuation precedes it.

Field 245 examples:

245 00 |a Dark shadows |h[videorecording].
245 10 |a Where’s Waldo?.
245 14 |a The life of Susan B.

Field 250 example:

250 __ |a [Blu-Ray version].
250 __ |a Library ed.

Field 655 example:

655 _7 |a Audiobooks. |2 lcgft

Originally published on July 13, 2012.


Tip #139: Fixed Fields for Sound Recordings

The Fixed Field grid is exactly the same for musical and nonmusical sound recordings. Most of the fields use the same codes and rules as for books (ELvl, Srce, Lang, BLvl, Ctry, Desc, DtSt, and the two date fields), but there are a few that are different. Below is a cheat sheet of sorts for those fields.

FIXED FIELDS FOR AUDIOBOOKS

Type (Type of record) = i because it’s a nonmusical sound recording.
Audn (Audience) = Same code as for the book (e for adult, j for juvenile, a for preschool, etc.)
TrAr (Transportation and Arrangement) = n because it’s not notated music.
Part (Music Parts) = n because it’s not notated music.
LTxt (Literary Text for Sound Recordings) = Similar to the LitF code for books, but there’s no 1 for fiction and 0 for nonfiction. (NOTE: this is a 2-space field, so if you change or add codes, you need to follow the code with a spacebar unless you use two codes.) Commonly used codes include: a for autobiography, b for biography, d for drama, e for essays, f for fiction, h for history, i for instruction, m for memoirs, and p for poetry.
See OCLC’s Fixed Fields: Literary Text for Sound Recordings for the complete list.
FMus (Format of Music) = n because it’s not a music manuscript or printed music.
AccM (Accompanying Matter) Usually blank for audiobooks.
Comp (Form of Composition) = nn for audiobooks because it’s not a musical recording.

FIXED FIELDS FOR MUSIC CDS

Type (Type of record) = j
Audn (Audience) = Use g for an adult audience and one of the juvenile codes (a, b, c, d, j) if for children. May use e if there’s a parental advisory.
TrAr (Transportation and Arrangement) = n because it’s not notated music.
Part (Music Parts) = n because it’s not notated music.
LTxt (Literary Text for Sound Recordings) = blank because it’s a musical sound recording.
FMus (Format of Music) = n because it’s not a music manuscript or printed music.
AccM (Accompanying Matter) Leave blank unless content notes, etc. are substantial. (NOTE: this is a 6-space field, so if you change or add codes you must use the spacebar for each unused space, as in d-z-space-space-space-space in order for your changes to save.) Commonly used codes include d for libretto or text, e for biography of composer, f for biography of performer, and z for other. See OCLC’s Fixed Fields: Accompanying Matter for a complete list.
Comp (Form of Composition) = Always fill in for a music CD. Use the LOC subject heading(s) as a guide for selecting the code. Use the code mu if there’s a variety of forms on the recording. Codes include bg for bluegrass, bl for blues, co for concertos, cy for country music, jz for jazz, op for operas, pp for popular music, rc for rock music, and sy for symphonies. See OCLC’s Fixed Fields: Form of Composition for a complete list.

More information about Fixed Fields can be found on OCLC’s Fixed Fields resource page. Also, check out Fixed Fields in Evergreen Indiana (2010).

Originally published on June 29, 2012.


Tip #95: Cheat Sheet—5xxFields for DVDs (Updated)

A bibliographic record for a videorecording is loaded with 5xx fields. Unlike the rest of the variable fields, these note fields are not supposed to be in exact numerical order. To help EI catalogers get the 5xx fields in correct order, we distributed a cheatsheet in November of 2009 that was very popular. Here it is again, slightly updated.

5xx fields for DVDs

538—Format, such as “DVD; region 1; widescreen (1.85:1) presentation; NTSC.”
546—Language and captioning, such as “Language tracks in English, dubbed French or dubbed Spanish, with optional English, French or Spanish subtitles.” or “Closed-captioned.”
500—Source of title proper, if other than the video title frames (the film itself) or physical carrier labels (disc surface). Example: “Title from container.”
500—Notes about variations in the title and parallel titles (Use a 246 field for the actual variant title)
511—Cast, players, performers, narrators, presenters. 1st indicator is a 1 (cast) or 0 (no display constant).
508—Credits: list of persons other than cast who are not listed in the 245. List the function first and separate functions with a semicolon. Example: “Photographers, Carlos Ruiz and Bill Thompson ; Photo editor, Susan Moore.”
500—Edition & history, such as “Originally released as a motion picture in 2009.”, “Based on the novel by __.”, or “Sequel to: ______.”
518—Notes about when and where item was filmed, broadcast, etc., such as “Film on location in Jackson Hole, Wyoming.”
500—Any further publication history and distribution information not in the 260, such as “First released in Canada in 2010.”
500—Physical characteristics of recording, such as sound, color, double-sided. (However, combine with 538 if present)
500—Notes about accompanying material
500—Notes about series information, such as “Series information from container insert.”
521—Audience (MPAA rating). 1st indicator is usually an 8 (no display constant). Also add statements from container such as “Suggested for ages 3-5.”
530—Notes about other formats, such as “Also issued on videocassette.”
520—Summary
500—Descriptive contents note, such as “Special features include…..”
505—Contents
500—Notes about any publisher’s numbers an UPC codes
540—Terms governing use and reproduction
586—Awards note, such as “Academy Award, 2009: Best Picture; Best Director.”
501—”With” notes

Remember, all 5xx fields end with a period.


Tip #17: Cheat Sheet – 5xx Field Order for Sound Recordings

We’ve received several requests for more 5xx field order cheat sheets. Here’s one for sound recordings:

5XX FIELD ORDER FOR SOUND RECORDINGS

538 Format – system details & requirements
500 Nature and form
546 Language
500 Source of title proper (“Title from container”)
500 Variations in title
500 Parallel titles / Other title information
500 Statement of responsibility (“Based on a poem by”)
511 Cast – featured performers, presenters, narrators (“Narrated by”)
508 Credits (“Music and lyrics by …. ; musical arrangements by …”)
500 Edition and history (“Unabridged”, “Reissue of”, “From the soundtrack of the motion picture”, “Sequel to:”)
518 Date / Time / Place (“Recorded at Music Hall on”)
500 Publication, dist., etc. and date info (“Includes unreleased and previously released material”)
500 Physical description (“Compact disc”)
500 Accompanying materials (“Lyrics inserted in container”)
500 Series (“Originally issued in the series: __”)
521 Audience (“Parental advisory, explicit lyrics”)
530 Other formats (“Issued also on cassette”)
520 Summary
505 Contents
500 Publisher’s number, distributor’s stock numbers, UPC codes
506 Restrictions on access
540 Terms governing use
501 “with” notes

Originally published on December 18, 2009.


Tip #14: Cheat Sheet – 5xx Field Order for DVDs

Remembering the correct order for the 5xx fields is not easy. Many of us catalogers have cheat sheets hiding under our keyboards already, but here’s one especially for DVDs:

5XX FIELD ORDER FOR DVDS

538—Format
546—Language and captioning
500—Source of title proper, such as “Title from container”
500—Notes about variations in the title
500—Notes about parallel titles
511—Cast – players, performers, narrators, presenters
508—Credits – List persons other than cast
500—Edition history—such as the original release date of a motion picture
500—Any further publication history and distribution information
500—Physical characteristics of recording, such as sound, color, double–sided disc
500—Notes about accompanying material
500—Notes about series information, such as “Series information from container insert.”
521—Audience (MPAA rating)
530—Notes about other formats “Also issued on videocassette”
520—Summary
505—Contents
500—Notes about any publisher’s numbers and UPC codes
540—Terms governing use and reproduction
501—“With” notes

Because the records for videorecordings are often huge, it’s especially important to get the 5xx fields in the right order. This makes it easier to check the Evergreen record against information on the item in hand when cataloging. Limitations of many of our previous automation systems did not allow for the correct ordering of 5xx fields, so many records migrated to Evergreen with the 5xx fields in numerical, not AACR2 order. We should all do what we can to straighten out the records.
Originally published on November 27, 2009.



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MARC Fields