Archive for the ‘Authority Files’ Category

Tip #125: Checking the Authority Record for the 100 field

Sometimes the author’s name on a book is in a slightly different form or is spelled differently than it appears in the 100 field of the MARC record. That’s because the 100 field contains the author’s name in the form established in the national authority file, which does not necessarily correspond with how the author or publisher decide to note the author’s name on the book.

This variance is often found with with Asian names and names from other languages using different alphabets. There are specific rules used for transliterating names from other alphabets into our alphabet.

Using the name from the authority file ensures that all the author’s books are connected in the catalog, even when the name is listed differently on different works. Using the authorized name on the spine label ensures that works by that author are grouped together on the shelf.

The name in the 245 field should always match the title page, but the 100 field may or may not match what is in the book.

If you are concerned that the 100 field might not be correct, or if you are originally cataloging a work, look up the name in the authority files on the Library of Congress Authorities website. The procedure is essentially the same as for searching for authorized series names (see Tip #123) except select “Name Authority Headings” as the search type. Try the help function if you have trouble with your search. When you get to the authority file, the authorized name will be in the 100 field. The 400 fields contain ‘see references’ which are the names associated with the author but not the established name that belongs in the 100 field. If you typed in a name that is not the authorized name, you’ll see the name you typed in one of these fields. When you copy the name from the 100 field into your record, be sure to also copy the indicator and any subfields.

Examples:

100 1 $a Sin, Kyŏng-suk.
245 10 $a Please look after mom / $c Kyung-sook Shin ; translated from the Korean by Chi-Young Kim.

100 1 $a Ōkami, Mineko.
245 10 $a Dragon Knights. $n Volume 2 / $c Mineko Ohkami.

Originally published on March 16, 2012.


Tip #123: How to search the LC Authorities website for a series title

Most Evergreen catalogers know that fiction series information is important to our patrons, so we check for this information in the bibliographic record. We make sure that the series name is in a 490 field (1st indicator 1) exactly as it appears on the item we are cataloging. But what goes in the 8xx field?

The 8xx field contains the established name for the series. Sometimes the name of a series appears with slight variations on each book (Suzie Q mystery, Suzie Q novel, Tales of Q), or changes dramatically as the series progresses. This can be confusing to a patron or staff member, so catalogers tie all the variations together by using an established series name in the 8xx field. Often the series name in the book is exactly the same as the established series name, but sometimes it’s not.

IMPORTANT: Never assume that the series name as it appears in the book (or the container if an audiobook or DVD) is also the established series name that belongs in the 8xx field. Always look it up.

So where do we look it up? The first place to look for the established or authorized series title is the Library of Congress Authorities website. Unfortunately, this website is not always easy to navigate, so here’s step by step instructions:

  1. Go to the Authorities website.
  2. Click “Search Authorities”.
  3. Type in the series name as it appears on the resource, omitting any leading articles (A, An, The).
  4. Select “Title Authority Headings” from the search type pull-down menu.
  5. Click “Begin Search”.

On the results screen, there are series and non-series titles, identified in the right hand “Type of Heading” column. Find the series title that matches your item.

  • If the red button next to the title says “Authorized Heading”:
    1. Click the red button.
    2. Click on the series name to bring up the authority file.
    3. You’ll see that the name of the series is in the 130 field. This means that this authorized series title should be added to your record in an 830 field. The indicators in the 130 authority record field are the same as what you’ll use in the 830. There is never a first indicator and the second one is almost always a zero.
  • If the red button next to the title says “References”:
    1. Click the red button.
    2. Click on the words “Authority Record” (NOT the series name).
    3. Click on the name of the series to bring up the authority file.
    4. You’ll see the series name in a 100 field, which means your series information belongs in an 800 field.

      What goes in the 800 field is exactly what is in the authority file in the 100 field – author name as well as title. Copy the indicators and subfields exactly. If there’s a subfield d for the author’s date of birth, that goes in the 800 too. This is a GREAT use for the flat text editor.

In the first example above, the series being checked is written by multiple authors, so the authorized series title goes in a 830 field. In the second, the series is by a single author, so the authorized series name goes in a 800 field together with the author information.

You wouldn’t have to click all the way through to the authority record except that sometimes there are notes in the file about when to use the series information in a record and when not to. Also, by viewing the authority file, you can see the correct indicators and subfields that should be used.

So what if the series you’re looking for isn’t listed on the LC Authorities website?

Some series titles established in Evergreen are not LC authorized series titles. That’s because as a consortium we decided that tracing series is very important to our customers and we need to establish our own series titles even if there isn’t an authority file.

So if you cannot locate the series name using the LC Authorities website, first search Evergreen for the series name (do a series search) to see what other libraries have used in the 8xx field. If there seems to be a lot of variation, pick the name most frequently or recently used. Libraries with a NoveList subscription will establish series titles with the name that database uses if there is no LC authority file.

Other sources for series information are: Fantastic Fiction, KDH’s What’s Next, and FictionDB.

If you establish a new series title in Evergreen, remember that a series name appearing in the 800 field NEVER has leading articles, so omit the A, An or The from the series name.

A final note: Series statements never belong in the 245 field, even if that information appears on the title page. Our series statements (490/8xx fields) are now part of the Record Summary in the OPAC and can be easily viewed by staff and patrons.

For more information about how to add series information to a record, see Tip of the Week #55 (October 2010) and the EI Cataloging Procedures Guide.
Originally published on March 2, 2012.


Tip #57: Listservs for Catalogers

Here are some cataloger-oriented listservs that members of the EI Cataloging Committee have found to be helpful:

  1. Evergreen Support: Important Evergreen information is often cross-posted to the Cataloging Listserv, but information about system problems appear here first and in greater detail.
  2. OCLC-CAT: Created for use by OCLC users, non-OCLC library catalogers can also subscribe. Although most posts address issues specific to OCLC, there are some discussions about MARC records useful to all catalogers.
  3. ALCTS-eforum (Association for Library Collections & Technical Services): Periodically hosts eforums on topics of interest to catalogers. Popular forums can produces hundreds of posts, like the recent one on RDA, but you can temporarily unsubscribe if a pending eforum is not of interest to you.
  4. INCOLSA/MCLS listservs: Get announcements about upcoming training and roundtables.
  5. OLAC (Online Audiovisual Catalogers): A discussion for catalogers of nonprint materials.

If there are any other cataloging related listservs you would like to recommend, please let me know or simply post them at evergreen_indiana-catalog@lists.in.gov
Originally published on October 15, 2010.


Tip #54: Author’s names in the 100 field

The 100 field contains the author’s name in the form established in the national authority file. With Asian names and names from other languages using different alphabets, these are often different than the form listed on the book because there are specific rules used for transliterating names from other alphabets into our alphabet. Using the name from the authority file ensures that all the author’s books are connected in the catalog, even when the name is listed differently on different works. Using the authorized name on the spine label ensures that works by that author are grouped together on the shelf.

The name in the 245 field should always match the title page, but the 100 field may or may not match what is in the book.

If you are concerned that the 100 field might not be correct, you can look up the name in the authority files on the Library of Congress Authorities website. Be sure to select ‘Name Authority Headings’ as the search type.
Originally published on September 24, 2010.


Tip #46: LCSH Change for ‘Cookery’

Although it’s been posted on other listservs, some Evergreen catalogers may not be aware that last month the Library of Congress issued new and revised subject headings for materials on cooking and cookbooks.
The word “cookery” has been changed to “cooking” in about 800 subject headings. In addition, a topical subject heading of “Cookbooks” and a genre/form heading of “Cookbooks” have been approved.
This means that instead of “Cookery, Greek”, we should now use “Cooking, Greek” and instead of “Cookery (Kudzu)”, we should now use “Cooking (Kudzu)” in our subject headings. We can also add a subject or genre/form heading “Cookbooks”.
When editing or importing MARC records for cooking related resources into Evergreen, examine and correct the subject headings, if necessary. To look up authorized subject headings, go to the Library of Congress Authorities website. To understand your search results on that site, click the green “Help” button at the top of the page.

Note: The old “cookery” subject headings will still appear in the existing Evergreen records until a cataloger corrects them. This means that the Circulation Staff must continue to educate patrons to use the search term ‘cookery’ when looking for a cookbook.
Originally published on July 30, 2010.


Tip #40: When a title is part of more than one series

Both the 490 and the 8xx fields are repeatable, so if your title is part of more than one series, you can include both in the MARC record.
Examples:

245 10 Burning lamp / |c Amanda Quick.
490 1 An Arcane Society novel ; |v bk. 8
490 1 Dreamlight trilogy ; |v bk. 2
800 1 Quick, Amanda. |t Arcane Society novel ; |v bk. 8.
800 1 Krentz, Jayne Ann. |t Dreamlight trilogy ; |v bk. 2.

245 14 The maverick / |c Jan Hudson.
490 1 Harlequin American romance ; |v 1306
490 0 Texas outlaws
830 0 Harlequin American romance ; v 1306.

Remember, you can check the Library of Congress Authorities web site for established series titles.
For more information about series information in MARC records, see the Evergreen Indiana Cataloging Procedures Guide, p. 2.18-2.2 and OCLC Bibliographic Formats and Standards.
Originally published on June 11, 2010.


Tip #36: Adding Subject Headings

Evergreen Cat1 catalogers are required to use at least one established subject heading in all bibliographic records.

To satisfy this requirement, catalogers and not limited to the 650 field, but can add other 6xx fields such as a 600, 610, or 651.

Please use Library of Congress Subject Headings (LCSH). One of the easiest ways to check for authorized headings is online at http://authorities.loc.gov/

Hint: If you are cataloging material that is available in another format or edition, you can often find subject headings for your item on one of those other records.

Please do not add local subject headings.

Here’s a quick description of the different 6xx fields you can use to satisfy the EI subject heading requirement:

Topical headings:

650 _0 |a Apples |x Harvesting.

Geographic headings:

651 _0 |a United States |x History |y French and Indian War, 1755-1763.

Personal names:

600 10 |a Horne, Lena.

Corporate names:

610 10 |a Indiana. |b Dept. of Child Services.

Originally published on May 14, 2010.



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