Posts Tagged ‘100’

Tip #135: CIP Record Reminders

CIP (Cataloging In Publication) MARC records require more than the usual amount of editing when importing them into Evergreen. These records were created without the actual item in hand so information is often missing or incorrect. CIP records can be easily recognized by the “8” in the Encoding Level (ELvl) fixed field.

Records already in Evergreen that were one time CIP records may not have been carefully edited so be sure to examine them closely for missing or incorrect information.

When editing a CIP record:

  • Make sure the title in the 245 field matches the information on the title page. There may be subtle differences that can be easily overlooked. Subtitles may be totally different or nonexistent.
  • Check the order of the authors in the statement of responsibility (245, subfield c). Remember changes here affect the 100 and 700 fields.
  • Always delete the 263 field. This was the projected publication date, so it’s no longer important.
  • Complete the pagination, illustration, and dimension fields in the 300 field. Until the book was actually published, there was no way to know this information, so this field is always blank except for “p. cm.”.
    Remember to put the information in appropriate subfields (|a for pagination, |b for illustrations, and |c for dimensions). Don’t forget punctuation, and remember anything indicated in subfield ‘b’ needs to be reflected in the Illustrations (Ills) fixed field.
  • Add edition and series information (if applicable).
  • Add page numbers for the bibliographic references in the 504 field (if applicable).
  • Check the contents listed in the 505 (if applicable).
  • Replace the “8” in the Encoding Level (ELvl) fixed field with a “K” to reflect the new level of cataloging, or you can just leave the field blank. If you leave it blank, remember you need to create a space in the field to replace the 8, otherwise the change won’t “take”.

Don’t be misled by title and other information in the CIP portion of the title page verso. The MARC record should be based on the actual item.
Originally published on June 1, 2012.


Tip #131: Multiple authors & the ‘Rule of Three’

If your resource lists three or fewer authors on the title page:

  • the first named person or corporate body is the main entry and appears in the 1xx field
  • the first indicator in the 245 field is a 1
  • each of the other authors are added entries appearing in 7xx fields

Example:

Title: Volunteer vacations : short-term adventures that will benefit you and others (by) Bill McMillon, Doug Cutchins, and Anne Geissinger.
100 1_ a| McMillon, Bill, |d 1942-
245 10 a| Volunteer vacations : |b short-term adventures that will benefit you and others / |c Bill McMillon, Doug Cutchins, and Anne Geissinger.
700 1_ a| Cutchins, Doug.
700 1_ a| Geissinger, Anne.

However, if there are more than three authors and principal responsibility is not attributed to anyone:

  • there is no 1xx field
  • the title is the main entry (245 field, first indicator 0)
  • only the first author listed on the title page is named in the statement of responsibility (245, subfield c): “Joe Jones … [et al.].”
  • there is an added entry (7xx) only for the first named person or body responsible.

Example:

Title: American Icon: the fall of Roger Clemens and the rise of steroids in America’s pastime (by) Teri Thompson, Nathaniel Vinton, Michael O’Keeffe, and Christian Red.
(no 100 field)
245 00 a| American icon : |b the fall of Roger Clemens and the rise of steroids in America’s pastime / |c Teri Thompson … [et al.].
700 1_ a| Thompson, Teri.

Sometimes there are more than 3 authors but one is singled out as the primary contributor. One name may be in larger print, bold type, or separated from the other authors by the word “with”, as in “Thomas Patterson with Margaret Robinson, Sarah Rice, and Timothy Hubert”. In these cases, the primary author’s name goes in a 100 field and the rest belong in 700 fields. Of course, if there’s more than three secondary authors, list the first one followed by the .[et al.] and only put that name in a 700.
Originally published on April 27, 2012.


Tip #127: Watch the first indicator in the 100 field

It’s important to pay attention to the first indicator of the 100 field, especially with non-English names. We’re used to names being in last name, first name order in this field, but that is not always the case.

If the first indicator is a 0 instead of the usual 1, that means that the name is in direct order. This is important to recognize when you’re creating call numbers and spine labels.

Examples:

100 0_ $a Arnaldur Indriðason, $d 1961-
245 10 $a Hypothermia / $c Arnaldur Indridason ; translated by Victoria Cribb.

100 0_ $a Yrsa Sigurðardóttir.
245 10 $a Last rituals / $c Yrsa Sigurdardóttir ; translated from the Icelandic by Bernard Scudder.

100 1_ $a Perry, Anne.
245 10 $a Dorchester Terrace / $c Anne Perry.

Originally published on March 30, 2012.


Tip #125: Checking the Authority Record for the 100 field

Sometimes the author’s name on a book is in a slightly different form or is spelled differently than it appears in the 100 field of the MARC record. That’s because the 100 field contains the author’s name in the form established in the national authority file, which does not necessarily correspond with how the author or publisher decide to note the author’s name on the book.

This variance is often found with with Asian names and names from other languages using different alphabets. There are specific rules used for transliterating names from other alphabets into our alphabet.

Using the name from the authority file ensures that all the author’s books are connected in the catalog, even when the name is listed differently on different works. Using the authorized name on the spine label ensures that works by that author are grouped together on the shelf.

The name in the 245 field should always match the title page, but the 100 field may or may not match what is in the book.

If you are concerned that the 100 field might not be correct, or if you are originally cataloging a work, look up the name in the authority files on the Library of Congress Authorities website. The procedure is essentially the same as for searching for authorized series names (see Tip #123) except select “Name Authority Headings” as the search type. Try the help function if you have trouble with your search. When you get to the authority file, the authorized name will be in the 100 field. The 400 fields contain ‘see references’ which are the names associated with the author but not the established name that belongs in the 100 field. If you typed in a name that is not the authorized name, you’ll see the name you typed in one of these fields. When you copy the name from the 100 field into your record, be sure to also copy the indicator and any subfields.

Examples:

100 1 $a Sin, Kyŏng-suk.
245 10 $a Please look after mom / $c Kyung-sook Shin ; translated from the Korean by Chi-Young Kim.

100 1 $a Ōkami, Mineko.
245 10 $a Dragon Knights. $n Volume 2 / $c Mineko Ohkami.

Originally published on March 16, 2012.


Tip #119: Names with multiple initials – space or no space?

Question: When creating or editing MARC records, is it J.K. Rowling or J. K. Rowling? Is it Rowling, J.K. or Rowling, J.K.?

Answer:
In the 100, 700, or 800 field, always enter a space between initials of a personal name: Rowling, J. K.
In the 245 field, type the name with no spaces between initials: J.K. Rowling.

Examples:

100 1_ |a Griffin, W. E. B. (spaces between initials)
245 14 |a The traffickers / |c W.E.B. Griffin and William E. Butterworth IV. (no spaces)
100 1_ |a Beaton, M. C. (spaces between initials)
245 14 |a There goes the bride / |c M.C. Beaton (no spaces)

In contrast, never put spaces between initials of a corporate name, no matter where it appears in the record.

Example:

110 2_ |a J.C. Penney. (no spaces)
260 __ |a New York : |b W.W. Norton, |c 2001. (no spaces)

The basic rule in a nutshell: Anytime a personal or corporate name is in direct order, there are no spaces between the initials. If the format is last name, first name, then put a space between the initials.
Originally published on February 3, 2012.


Tip #54: Author’s names in the 100 field

The 100 field contains the author’s name in the form established in the national authority file. With Asian names and names from other languages using different alphabets, these are often different than the form listed on the book because there are specific rules used for transliterating names from other alphabets into our alphabet. Using the name from the authority file ensures that all the author’s books are connected in the catalog, even when the name is listed differently on different works. Using the authorized name on the spine label ensures that works by that author are grouped together on the shelf.

The name in the 245 field should always match the title page, but the 100 field may or may not match what is in the book.

If you are concerned that the 100 field might not be correct, you can look up the name in the authority files on the Library of Congress Authorities website. Be sure to select ‘Name Authority Headings’ as the search type.
Originally published on September 24, 2010.


Tip #31: CIP Record Reminders

CIP (Cataloging In Publication) MARC records require more than the usual amount of editing when importing them into Evergreen. These records were created without the actual item in hand so information is often missing or incorrect. CIP records can be easily recognized by the “8” in the Encoding Level (ELvl) fixed field.

When importing a CIP record:

  • Make sure the 245 field matches the information on the title page. The title often has subtle changes that can be easily overlooked. Check the order of the authors in the statement of responsibility. Remember changes here affect the 100 and 700 fields.
  • Delete the 263 field.
  • Complete the 300 field. Check for illustrations. Anything indicated in subfield ‘b’ needs to be reflected in the Illustrations (Ills) fixed field.
  • Add page numbers for the bibliographic references in the 504 field (if applicable).
  • Check the contents listed in the 505 (if applicable).
  • Replace the “8” in the Encoding Level (ELvl) fixed field with an “I” or “K” to reflect the new level of cataloging.

Don’t be misled by title and other information in the CIP portion of the title page verso. The MARC record should be based on the actual item.

Records already in Evergreen that were one time CIP records may not have been carefully edited so be sure to examine them closely for missing or incorrect information.

The section in our Cataloging Procedures Guide regarding CIP records (p. 2.5-2.6) is currently being revised.
Originally published on April 9, 2010.


Tip #10: Author Initials

Is it M. C. Beaton or M.C. Beaton?

When typing the author’s name in the 100 field, always enter a space between the initials.

Do not put spaces between initials in personal or corporate names in the descriptive part of the record, such as the 245 field.

Examples:

100 1_ |a Beaton, M. C. (space between initials)
245 10 |a There goes the bride / M.C. Beaton. (no space between initials)

100 1_ |a Griffin, W. E. B. (spaces)
245 14 |a The traffickers / |c W.E.B. Griffin and William E. Butterworth IV. (no spaces)

100 1_ |a Doctorow, E. L. |d 1931- (spaces)
245 1_ |a Homer & Langley : |b a novel / |c E.L. Doctorow. (no spaces)


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