Posts Tagged ‘505’

Tip #146: Content Notes and Summaries

Enhancing a record by adding contents (505 field) and/or a summary (520 field) will help keep your patrons happy. Library users like being able to learn something about a resource other than just title and subject headings when browsing the OPAC, and the keywords provided in these fields ensures that the item will be included in their search results.

Always add a 505 for a collection of works unless the information is found elsewhere in the record. Adding the contents of a do-it-yourself, medical, or crafts book may be the only way your patron can find the resource he/she needs.

Adding a contents note is easy. Use 0 (zero) for the first indicator and separate each contents heading with a space-dash-dash-space. Use the same punctuation rules as for the title proper (generally only capitalize the first word and proper names) and end the field with a period. If you’re listing essays or stories written by different authors, separate the title from the author’s name with a space-forward slash-space.

505 0_ |a The hoof — The leg — Conformation — Farriery — Boots and wraps — Lameness — Joint disease — First aid — Resources.
505 0_ |a Introduction / Carol Serling — Curve / Loren D. Estleman — Reversal of fortune / Robert J. Serling — By the book / Nancy Holder — Earthfall / John Farris — Dead post bumper / Dean Wesley Smith.
505 0_ |a Bride on the loose — Same time, next year.

Try to take the time to add summaries whenever possible, especially on juvenile fiction. If you discover a variety of summary notes while merging, you can paste in more than one. The 520 field is repeatable, but only the first one appears in the OPAC view. All the 520 fields will be searchable.

A 520 summary note should contain a brief and objective summary of the content of the resource. If you come across a particularly wordy summary, you can edit it if you’d like, but remember to leave the important keywords. If the summary reads more like a magazine ad, you can delete some of the over-the-top flattering language, but leave the rest. If you copy a summary from someplace like Amazon, NoveList, or Publisher’s Weekly, remember to credit your source.

When merging, if the record you select as the lead record is missing one of these fields but a record being merged contains the information, take a minute to use the Flat-Text Editor to copy and paste the missing fields into the lead record.
Originally published on August 17, 2012.


Tip #138: Multiple Works by Same Author and No Collective Title

If the item being cataloged is made up of more than one work by the same author but does not have an inclusive, collective title, use subfield b for the subsequent title(s).

  • Separate the subsequent titles with a semicolon. This means subfield b is preceded by a semicolon, not a colon.
  • Transcribe the titles in the order they appear on the chief source of information.
  • Capitalize the first word of each title.
  • You can use an a 7xx field to provide access to the subsequent titles.
  • If a single subtitle applies to all works (by a single author), place it after all the titles, preceded by a colon.

Examples:

245 12 |a A Christmas kiss ;|b and, Winter wonderland /|c Elizabeth Mansfield.
740 02 |a Winter wonderland.

245 14 |a The cat in the hat |h[videorecording] ;|b The cat in the hat comes back ; Fox in socks /|c Random House Home Video.
740 42 |a The cat in the hat comes back.
740 02 |a Fox in socks.

245 10 |a Dinny and the witches ;|b and, The miracle worker : two plays.
740 42 |a The miracle worker.

Note that field 246 (varying form of title) is only used for titles related to the work selected as the title proper, not the subsequent titles listed in subfield b.

In cases where one of the works in a resource is predominant, do not follow these guidelines but use the predominant title as the title proper in the 245 and put the other title(s) in a 505 (contents note).
Originally published on June 22, 2012.


Tip #135: CIP Record Reminders

CIP (Cataloging In Publication) MARC records require more than the usual amount of editing when importing them into Evergreen. These records were created without the actual item in hand so information is often missing or incorrect. CIP records can be easily recognized by the “8” in the Encoding Level (ELvl) fixed field.

Records already in Evergreen that were one time CIP records may not have been carefully edited so be sure to examine them closely for missing or incorrect information.

When editing a CIP record:

  • Make sure the title in the 245 field matches the information on the title page. There may be subtle differences that can be easily overlooked. Subtitles may be totally different or nonexistent.
  • Check the order of the authors in the statement of responsibility (245, subfield c). Remember changes here affect the 100 and 700 fields.
  • Always delete the 263 field. This was the projected publication date, so it’s no longer important.
  • Complete the pagination, illustration, and dimension fields in the 300 field. Until the book was actually published, there was no way to know this information, so this field is always blank except for “p. cm.”.
    Remember to put the information in appropriate subfields (|a for pagination, |b for illustrations, and |c for dimensions). Don’t forget punctuation, and remember anything indicated in subfield ‘b’ needs to be reflected in the Illustrations (Ills) fixed field.
  • Add edition and series information (if applicable).
  • Add page numbers for the bibliographic references in the 504 field (if applicable).
  • Check the contents listed in the 505 (if applicable).
  • Replace the “8” in the Encoding Level (ELvl) fixed field with a “K” to reflect the new level of cataloging, or you can just leave the field blank. If you leave it blank, remember you need to create a space in the field to replace the 8, otherwise the change won’t “take”.

Don’t be misled by title and other information in the CIP portion of the title page verso. The MARC record should be based on the actual item.
Originally published on June 1, 2012.


Tip #72: Unformatted Contents Note (500 field)

Use an unformatted contents note to provide general information about the contents of a resource that is not described elsewhere in the record.

500 Special features: Filmmaker commentary, deleted scenes, and music video.
500 Includes reading group guide (p. 324-325).
500 Adoption records do not include years 1842-1847.
500 Includes excerpt from So enchanting by Connie Brockway (p. [379]-388).
500 “Includes 10 sing-along songs!”
500 “An official training publication of the American Kennel Club”–Cover.
500 Includes index.

As with all 500 notes, end the field with a period, question mark, exclamation point or hyphen. Use a period even if the statement ends in brackets or parenthesis.

Place an Unformatted Contents Note above the 505 field.
Use quotation marks if quoting from the item in hand. Follow the quote by an indication of its source unless that source is the chief source of information.

A 505 Formatted Contents Note is used to list contents of a collection or headings from the Table of Contents. If the resource includes bibliographical references as well as an index, combine this information in a 504.
Originally published on February 18, 2011.


Tip #58:Contents Notes and Summaries in MARC records

Adding Contents and Summary Notes to Evergreen records is encouraged. These fields are useful to both patrons and staff.

Unless the information found in these fields is incorrect or inappropriate, please do not delete 505 or 520 fields.

When merging, if the record you select as the lead record is missing one of these fields but a record being merged contains the information, take a minute to copy the Contents Note or Summary Note before merging, then paste it into the record that remains in Evergreen.

A 505 Contents Note is often worth the time and effort to create. Always add a 505 for a collection of works unless the information is found elsewhere in the record. Remember, this field is searchable in a keyword search, so adding the contents of a do-it-yourself or crafts book may be the only way your patron can find the resource he/she needs. You don’t have to get fancy – just include all the information in subfield a:

  • 505 0 |a The hoof — The leg — Conformation — Farriery — Boots and wraps — Lameness — Joint disease — First aid — Resources.
  • 505 0 |a Introduction / Carol Serling — Curve / Loren D. Estleman — Reversal of fortune / Robert J. Serling — By the book / Nancy Holder — Earthfall / John Farris — Dead post bumper / Dean Wesley Smith.
  • 505 0 |a Bride on the loose — Same time, next year.

A 520 Summary Note should contain a brief and objective summary of the content of the resource. If you come across a particularly wordy summary, you can edit it if you’d like, but remember to leave the important keywords. If the summary reads more like a magazine ad, you can delete some of the over-the-top flattering language, but leave the rest.

Try to take the time to add summaries whenever possible, especially on juvenile fiction. If you discover a variety of Summary Notes while merging, you can paste in more than one. The 520 field is repeatable, but only the first one appears in the OPAC view. All the 520 fields will be searchable.
Originally published on October 22, 2010.


Tip #35: Original Cataloging—Vertical Files

Vertical files created at your library can be cataloged in Evergreen. Use the K-level book template and fill as many fields that you wish to.

There is no set standard in Evergreen Indiana as to what should be included in vertical records since they are K-level records. However, the more information in the record, the more keywords are created to assist your patrons in locating the material in the OPAC.

Things to consider:

  • You may want to include a 260 field to indicate the date the vertical file was created.
  • Decide if you want to include a 505 content note. If the materials in the file are subject to change, this may not be a good idea unless you plan to update the record regularly.
  • Add a 599 field for Vertical file.
  • Be sure to add at least one LCSH subject heading.

Here’s a sample of a vertical file MARC record:

008070101s2010 e 0 0 0 eng d
043. |a n-us-in
092 . |a H VF Acc
245 00.|a Accidents. |p Hendricks County, 2005 |h [vertical file]
260 |c [2010]
300. |a 1 manila folder ; |c 24 x 38 cm.
599 . |a Vertical file record.
650 0. |a Accidents |z Indiana |z Hendricks County.

Originally published on May 7, 2010.


Tip #31: CIP Record Reminders

CIP (Cataloging In Publication) MARC records require more than the usual amount of editing when importing them into Evergreen. These records were created without the actual item in hand so information is often missing or incorrect. CIP records can be easily recognized by the “8” in the Encoding Level (ELvl) fixed field.

When importing a CIP record:

  • Make sure the 245 field matches the information on the title page. The title often has subtle changes that can be easily overlooked. Check the order of the authors in the statement of responsibility. Remember changes here affect the 100 and 700 fields.
  • Delete the 263 field.
  • Complete the 300 field. Check for illustrations. Anything indicated in subfield ‘b’ needs to be reflected in the Illustrations (Ills) fixed field.
  • Add page numbers for the bibliographic references in the 504 field (if applicable).
  • Check the contents listed in the 505 (if applicable).
  • Replace the “8” in the Encoding Level (ELvl) fixed field with an “I” or “K” to reflect the new level of cataloging.

Don’t be misled by title and other information in the CIP portion of the title page verso. The MARC record should be based on the actual item.

Records already in Evergreen that were one time CIP records may not have been carefully edited so be sure to examine them closely for missing or incorrect information.

The section in our Cataloging Procedures Guide regarding CIP records (p. 2.5-2.6) is currently being revised.
Originally published on April 9, 2010.



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